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September 23, 2014

10 Hallmarks of Benedictine Education (Part 9)


At Saint Vincent Archabbey many of our monks are involved in our College Apostolate. Some serve as Professors in departments such as Theology, Philosophy, Mathematics, English, Science or Business, while others work in the Library or Campus Ministry. Needless to say, our Benedictine Heritage influences the way that we educate our students as a WHOLE human person, Body, Mind, and Soul.

Thus, this series of posts will focus on the 10 Hallmarks of a Benedictine Education. 





9. Hospitality: call to openness


The practice of listening and humility in a Benedictine monastery enables a generous hospitality to friends and strangers. Benedict urges that the weaknesses of all should be supported with the greatest patience (RB 72.5). Particular attention is to be given to those who are weak, poor or 
marginalized because, as Benedict says of the guest, Christ is found especially in them. Every
attempt is to be made to extend a gracious and respectful welcome to these persons as the sisters
and brothers they truly are.

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September 15, 2014

10 Hallmarks of Benedictine Education (Part 8)


At Saint Vincent Archabbey many of our monks are involved in our College Apostolate. Some serve as Professors in departments such as Theology, Philosophy, Mathematics, English, Science or Business, while others work in the Library or Campus Ministry. Needless to say, our Benedictine Heritage influences the way that we educate our students as a WHOLE human person, Body, Mind, and Soul.

Thus, this series of posts will focus on the 10 Hallmarks of a Benedictine Education. 





8. Stewardship: respect for the beauty and goodness of creation as a sacrament of God

At its core the Rule seeks to foster a fundamental reverence toward the creation that God has
made. Benedict exhorts his followers to regard all the tools and goods of the monastery as the
sacred vessels of the altar (RB 31.10). Benedictine monastics do not simply use up what has been
given to them, nor do they aim at poverty. Instead, they prize good stewardship, the wise and
moderate use of material things for the good of all, both present and future. This appreciation of
the good use of material things leads to a sacramental stance toward all creation and the
cultivation of beauty as modes of experiencing the presence of God.

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September 14, 2014

Discernment at the Cross

Today is the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross




Today we celebrate the Glory of God revealed in our Crucified Lord. If you desire to know your vocation and to do God's will, seek the Cross of Christ.

September 7, 2014

10 Hallmarks of Benedictine Education (Part 7)


At Saint Vincent Archabbey many of our monks are involved in our College Apostolate. Some serve as Professors in departments such as Theology, Philosophy, Mathematics, English, Science or Business, while others work in the Library or Campus Ministry. Needless to say, our Benedictine Heritage influences the way that we educate our students as a WHOLE human person, Body, Mind, and Soul. 

Thus, this series of posts will focus on the 10 Hallmarks of a Benedictine Education. 




7. Humility: acceptance of the demand for realism and accountability

Humility is Benedict's word for wisdom. He begins his extended description of the twelve degrees of
humility with awe at the abiding presence of God and ends with the love that casts out fear (RB 7).
Benedictine humility accepts the reality of the day-to-day world - nature, events, other people -
and our true place within it. This practical realism demands honesty and accountability of everyone
in a Benedictine house. Each monastic seeks to acknowledge his or her faults and weaknesses.
Each strives to recognize their own gifts and the gifts of others with gratitude, seeking to contribute
as much as possible to the good of the whole and accepting the care of others.

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September 3, 2014

Family Fosters Vocations

Apostolic Exhortation, Pastores Dabo Vobis, 1992


The pastoral care of vocations finds its first and natural setting in the family. Indeed, parents should know how to welcome as a grace the gift which God gives them in calling one of their sons or daughters to the priesthood or religious life. Such a grace must be asked for in prayer and received actively, by means of an education which allows the young people to perceive all the richness and joy of consecrating oneself to God…. The family is the natural “nursery” of vocations. Pastoral care of the family, therefore, should direct a very special attention to the properly vocational aspect of its task. (#3)

Pax et Gaudium

O.S.B. Vocation Awareness

O.S.B. Vocation Awareness